workshops

October intro to alternative process printing workshop at UT

Hey kids! I'm offering my alternative photography intro course again in October.

UT sets the tuition, and these courses are an absolute bargain. About 120.00 for a four session course - including materials! This means I am hardly turning a dime, but they are a lot of fun to teach.

The course description includes cyanotypes, salt, and van dyke prints but I will probably introduce something new. Last time we winged it a bit and it made for a great learning experience.

Take a look: UT course listing 

 

June workshop complete and another in October

My students and I just wrapped up an intro to alternative printing workshop offered through UT informal Classes and I will be offering a similar course beginning in October. Over four sessions, students learned the basics of alternative process printing and made handmade photographic prints in threes processes; cyanotype, van dyke, and salt. This was the first time I offered the course through UT, and it was a great success. The students had a great time, learned all the basic skills to print, and were eager to get started on their own.

I'll be offering the same course starting in October. This course will also be four Sunday sessions offered in one of the design studios on the main UT campus. While the objectives and the core material will be the same, I'll vary the processes we will learn. We'll print using a basic process like vandyke or cyanotype and possibly albumen. Details will be nailed down in the next couple of months. Look for the course to appear in the course listings and if you have any questions or request for the course, just drop me a line. Also, don't forget, I am open to organizing one on one and group workshops on carbon printing and other processes.

 Make handmade prints of your very own, and be happy.

Make handmade prints of your very own, and be happy.

Alternative process into class at UT

This May I will be teaching an alternative process intro class through UT Informal classes. The class will be comprised of four three hours sessions and cover the basics of preparing images, making negatives for contact printing, making some salt and cyanotype prints, and more.

For more details check out the official class listing for Explore Alternative Photographic Printing. If you have questions about the course, just shoot me an email.

 

 

Pinhole to Print - An Alt Process Primer

Want to party like it's 1869? I'm currently designing an introductory course to alternative process printing and film photography I plan to offer in Austin Texas in the fall of 2013.  The course is designed for students who want to learn the fundamentals of taking an image from a film negative all the way through to a full size hand made print.

 Course materials include your own piece of fantastic plastic.

Course materials include your own piece of fantastic plastic.

Accordingly, the course will focus as much on foundational skills applicable to all alt process printing as it will the specific processes we employ in making our prints. To build confidence, emphasize basic skills, and have fun, we will take and develop pinhole images on medium format film, scan and create full size digital negatives from the film negatives, and create a cyanotype or vandyke print. Included in the course materials will be a Holga pinhole camera. However, students will be encouraged to shoot and develop film from their own small and medium format cameras. I'll be available to teach students to use cameras they are unfamiliar with or advise students in purchasing a film camera suited to their needs and budget. Students can also use digital images.  

The course will be held in three weekly sessions and will be limited to six students. The course tuition will be approximately 250.00 and will include all materials.

The course materials and schedule are still under development. So, contact me directly if you are interested in enrolling.  

 

Photogravure at Renaissance Press

This August I was fortunate to attend a five day photogravure workshop with Paul Taylor at Renaissance Press. I've been planning to attend for over a year, and it was worth the wait. Like carbon transfer, photogravure is difficult.  There are nuances of the process and the materials that would have been fiendishly hard to learn on my own.  

 Paul inspecting positives with different contrast curves before exposing a photopolymer proof plate.

Paul inspecting positives with different contrast curves before exposing a photopolymer proof plate.

Well known as an atelier for his work in gravure, Paul was also an exceptional teacher. Over the course of five days I learned enough to carry on in gravure on my own. However, I was also happy that we when through the entire linerization process for producing high quality film positives for gravure. What I added to my knowledge of digital film was almost a workshop of material in itself.   

The days were long, but we were also able to take a crack at photopolymer gravure as well. All in all, I was able to produce two copper and one photopolymer plate and spend most of one day printing all three on the press. The printing time was enough to make inking and wiping the plates feel familiar and allowed Paul to show us a few special techniques like retrosage, dodging with hand and chalk, and stipling defects on the plate.

 Two copper gravures ready to be inked.

Two copper gravures ready to be inked.

 Stippling a defect in a plate. Photoshop 19th century style.

Stippling a defect in a plate. Photoshop 19th century style.

Beyond learning a specific process, I've found that attending a workshop is equally valuable for the exposure to exceptional prints, presentation, and working methods. As printers in high end niche processes, it's a rare and valuable opportunity to see exceptional work. Experiencing masterful work is inspiring and also offers a benchmark for where you are in your own craft. This was true for me when I took my first workshop from Sandy King and equally so at Renaissance Press. 

I highly recommend Paul's workshops. His studio is in a beautiful, but very rural part of New Hampshire. I biked the entire trip having flown into manchester from Austin. However, if you are going to bike it, expect some long rides and steep hills. Otherwise, look at renting car and having a relaxing stay in Keene or Brattleboro.